The Realme Watch 2 launches with 90 exercise modes, up to 12 days of battery life and a SpO2 sensor

The Realme Watch 2 comes pre-loaded with multiple watch faces and is IP68 certified. (Image source: Realme)
The Realme Watch 2

The Realme have been a officially unveiled it is latest budget smartwatch, the Realme Watch 2. A device contains some significant improvements compared to its predecessor, such as the many more of exercise modes and a larger battery. The Realme Watch 2 costs ~US$56 and is IP68 certified.

Realme have been the announced the Watch 2, its latest budget smartwatch. As expected, the Realme Watch 2 has a 1.4-inch display, a 305 mAh battery and is IP68 certified. According to Realme, the display had been a 323 PPI pixel density, a 600 nit peak brightness and a 320 x 320 resolution. We should stress that the display have been a thick bezels, which is something that Realme appears to downplay in its marketing materials.

Meanwhile, its 305 mAh battery should last up to 12 days between charges. Additionally, Realme have been a pre-loaded its latest smartwatch with 90 exercise modes, more than six times the volume that it included in it is predecessor. However, the company will be a only enable all these exercise of the modes in an OTA update. Unsurprisingly, Realme has also equipped the Watch 2 with a 24/7 heart rate monitor, although it’s unclear how this will affect battery life. There is a SpO2 sensor too, which is uncommon for a smartwatch at this price.

A Realme have been not confirmed if it plans to launch the Watch 2 internationally, but it have confirmed that the device will retail for MYR 229 (~US$56) in Malaysia. The Realme Watch 2 is compatible with Android and iOS devices via the Realme Link app, for reference.

Review:- OnePlus Watch doesn’t just settle, it demands you do too

Smartwatchs for Android are a tough subject. Wear OS works, but it have been a lot of flaws. Samsung Tizen-based smartwatch are great, but they are also pretty expensive and work best on Samsung’s own smartphones. Fitbit smartwatches are excellent for fitness, but not so amazing for smart features. That are why there was a lot of excitement for OnePlus to debut it is own smartwatch, the OnePlus Watch. The final product, though, is not what most people wanted, and after using it for nearly two weeks, it is hard to express just how disappointed I am in the OnePlus Watch.

HARDWARE:-

Alright, so let’s not start on a downer. The hardware of the first OnePlus smartwatch is by far the biggest highlight. Aside from one potential deal breaker, it is really nails the basics.

The chassis it-self is made from stainless steel, a premium material that you absolutely will be not find on any other smartwatch even close to this price range. The original Galaxy Watch Active is the closest comparison and, at $199, it is aluminum. The craftsmanship of the OnePlus Watch is genuinely nice with its slim body and tactile buttons. That are to taken down a bit by the plastic belly, but that’s far from a problem in my eyes.

Good news on the hardware front does not stop there, either. The included silicone band is very comfortable, and thanks to the use of 22mm spring pins, you can easily swap for a different strap if you want something else. The display is also a win with a bright panel and excellent 2.5D glass that feels really smooth to the touch. The display’s bezels are not super small, but there’s a neat CD-like pattern to add a bit of flare. It is a really nice and well-executed design overall.

The only big flaw of the design is just that this watch is pretty big. At 46mm it is hitting the top end of most other wearables out there, which is a disservice to anyone with less than a large wrist. I like to think that my wrist is not small, but is not huge either. I will be generally fallen into the camp of wanting a wearable around 44mm, give or take. For me, that means the Watch feels comfortable on my wrist, but it is far too big for, say, my wife to wear. Thus an issue OnePlus can fix in future iterations, and it is a problem that other first-generation smartwatches were plagued with too. However, the OnePlus Watch is coming out at a time where it could benefit from the better part of a decade of other companies making mistakes and figuring out what works in modern smartwatches, so the excuse of this being first-generation hardware feels a bit hollow.

That flaw extends to the band as well. It is a comfortable as mentioned, but if you want to shorter strap you need to ask OnePlus to send you one in a separate shipment.

Another arguably minor point I took issue with is the vibration motor. It is very weak and really easy to miss. Often it will be buzz and I won’t even notice. One morning, the OnePlus 9 Pro that the OnePlus Watch was paired to finished up a system update and proceeded to sync an entire night’s worth of notifications at once. It took a couple of seconds for me to recognize that the watch was buzzing to tell me about those notifications arriving. As it is stand today, there are no way to boost the strength of haptic feedback.

SOFTWARE :-

From the time the brand debuted in 2013 until the past couple of years, OnePlus was widely regarded as among the best when it is came to software on smartphones. OxygenOS was always clean and fast, quick to updates, and made sensible choices when it came to custom apps and features.

The OnePlus Watch does not use Android, Wear OS, or any other established platform for its software. Rather, it that uses a customized Real-Time OS, a similar backbone to what you are find on Fitbit, Amazfit, and other wearables in this category. With the many missteps Google has made with Wear OS, that seemed like a decent idea with a lot of potential. That did not work out.

The first thing that comes to mind with the software on the OnePlus Watch is unfinished, closely followed by sloppy. Let’s start with the design. As we detailed earlier this month, OnePlus opted to essentially clone the design of Google’s Wear OS, just stripping that design of a lot of animations and small perks. On the bright side, that means navigation is easy to understand, as regardless of how you feel about Wear OS, navigation is one thing Google absolutely got right with the platform.

On the other hand, what OnePlus have been created is a poor copy that it is scrambling to turn into something competitive. Notifications, for example, all looked identical at a glance with white text on a black background and the same generic bell icon. Minor, but frustrating especially when this is something nearly every other smartwatch does right. Just before this review was published, though, OnePlus did release an update to add different app icons and, sure enough, they’re different and it is a big improvement.

As mentioned, a lot of the software is also just grossly unfinished in ways that really made me scratch my head. 

Perhaps one of the most outstanding failures here is the inability to create a proper digital clock. You’d think such a simple and core part of a smartwatch wouldn’t be neglected, yet that’s exactly what’s happened. Until a new software update arrives at some point, the OnePlus Watch can’t show the time in a 12-hour format, which is widely used across the United States and India, two primary markets where the Watch is being sold. 

Speaking of not optimizing for core markets, there’s a lot of abbreviated English in the software. In many instances, “Please” is substituted for “Pls” including one hilarious notification. When you reach your daily step goal, the watch says that “Your step is up to standard. Pls keep it up.” This isn’t so much a functional issue as it is lack of attention to detail and a rushed overall final product. OnePlus could have and should have done better.

Another place this is evident is in sleep tracking, a pretty key feature for a watch that advertises up to two weeks on a single charge. Sleep tracking in itself seems to work, as the numbers it recorded for me are roughly the same as what I see from the new Nest Hub’s Soli-based tracking. I didn’t directly compare it to Fitbit, but the numbers are in the same ballpark with the exception of time spent “awake,” where Fitbit notoriously tends to count higher than the competition. What’s the problem, then? None of this data leaves the watch. There’s an entire section of the OnePlus Health app that’s designed to house sleep data but at press time it just doesn’t. OnePlus tells us a fix for this is coming in “mid-April” (in other words, last week) but it’s flabbergasting that the watch has gone on sale with this core function completely broken and utterly useless as a result.

There’s another portion of the health app that’s also broken. The workout tab has a Google Maps-powered map to show your run paths, but it just never loads. Frustrating! Another annoyance is that the watch is only launching with a fraction of the 110 workout modes that OnePlus promised, the rest of which are set to arrive sometime in May.

You may have noticed a pattern through much of this. OnePlus is relying on future software updates to fix a lot of the problems that reviewers and early users have pointed out. Well, those updates are going to be a pain, frankly. I installed two software updates during my time using the OnePlus Watch and both took the better part of an hour to fully install. The first also changed my system language from English to Chinese, though the second thankfully did not. For a sleep and activity tracking machine, that’s not great. It’s an experience I noticed on my Fitbit Versa 3 when it was installing an update over Bluetooth as well, but Fitbit at least provides the option to use Wi-Fi to download the update on the watch itself. OnePlus does not, despite having the needed hardware to do so.

Slow Bluetooth transfer times also affect another advertised feature of this watch, music. You get 2GB of storage for music files to play natively on your OnePlus Watch, but you have to transfer them from the phone, which can take quite a bit of time to do, especially for larger files. I have a feeling this will be an underused part of the watch anyway, though, given that it only works with MP3s, a strange choice in the era of Spotify, Apple Music, and others. I’m not sure about you, but I haven’t used an MP3 file for my music in easily five years.

Notably, the music app on the watch can control the music playing on your phone, but you’ll need to manually change the app to control the phone instead of controlling music playback on the watch.

I could go on with minor nitpicks about the software on OnePlus Watch, but I think my point has been made. OnePlus hasn’t spent nearly enough time putting together this software, and it feels like a product in its early stages of development. It’s amazing that this product has been announced given the state of the software, much more so that it’s actually shipping to customers.

To close out this section, though, I’ve got to address the bigger issue at play. OnePlus is responsible for fixing all of the flaws here because third-party developers literally can’t put apps on this product. There’s no store for apps or watchfaces at all. Most users won’t be hurt by the lack of watchfaces, as with the 50 that are included, there’s pretty much something for every style, but the lack of third-party apps hurts a lot. I don’t use a lot of apps on my Fitbit or Wear OS watches in general, but nearly all of the ones I do use are third-party options like Spotify. It’s fine to skip third-party software on a fitness tracker, but when you’re marketing a product as a smartwatch, it’s unacceptable.

FITNESS

It’s no secret that fitness tracking is what sells wearables nowadays, and in a smart move, that’s something OnePlus has focused on with this smartwatch. How does it compare? Being honest, I’m not the person to ask about this, as I don’t have nearly the amount of time I want to get out walking or properly work out, but I can speak from limited experience compared to a Fitbit Versa 3.

In general step counting, the OnePlus Watch usually lands in the same general ballpark as my Versa 3, but it’s inconsistent. In some cases, though, it seems to be considerably off from my average leaning toward the low end of the range. This is something that other OnePlus Watch users have also seen. Gizmodo saw some of the worst results, noting step counts that were off by up to 10,000 steps. OnePlus did release an update recently that’s supposed to address this issue.

OnePlus also promised over 110 workout modes for this product, but only 14 are included out of the box, with the rest to follow in an update. Between my schedule and an absolute dump of pollen, my activities for the past month have been restricted to getting yard work done, and that’s about it. I was able to get in a brief workout on the elliptical, though, which is one of the few workouts supported at this point.

In one brief session, the OnePlus Watch was tracking my heart rate as being off by upwards of 50bpm compared to a Versa 3 on my other wrist. Not that the watch had earned it, I gave OnePlus the benefit of the doubt that it was a fluke, stopped the workout, and readjusted the already fairly tight band. Sure enough, restarting the session seemed to patch things up. After that, heart rate levels were in the same place on both watches. Infuriatingly, though, the OnePlus Watch constantly paused the workout as I checked it in comparison. This is probably because it only takes one button click to pause a workout, but that’s an issue in my book; clicks can and do happen by mistake.

Notably, OnePlus also doesn’t add steps taken during a workout, at least on an elliptical, to your daily step count. That can easily be disheartening for someone who’s otherwise stuck at a desk.

I’m definitely not a fan of OnePlus’ “Activities” app on the watch. It’s confusing at a glance, only showing four quadrants for steps, calories burnt, activity time, and workout time. You’ll only see specifics for that data as you scroll down. Watchfaces mirror this design, and it really just doesn’t work well for its intended purpose.

This is an instance where copying is fine; rings just work better for showing this data quickly. That comes in addition to times where the watch just didn’t track a workout, something I’ve heard from other reviewers. Then, of course, there are the various tracking issues with the OnePlus Health app where it lacks important context or just doesn’t record data. The fitness software is a bit of a mess, but thankfully, the good news is that OnePlus can fix most of these problems with updates. But time will tell on that one, and you absolutely should not buy this product on the promise of future updates.

BATTERY LIFE

The “saving grace” many point to with the OnePlus Watch is battery life and, while good, it’s not good enough to save the product. 

OnePlus claims up to two weeks on a single charge for this smartwatch, a wild claim when Wear OS averages a day, barely, and both Apple and Samsung are around two to three days for most people. Even the Fitbit Versa 3 and Sense only average around five days in real-world usage. 

Does the claim live up? I think it’s possible, but it depends on how you use the product. If you’re using this solely for notifications and turn off some of the fitness features, you’ll hit two weeks easily. For more average use — lots of notifications, heart rate tracking, and sleep tracking — a little over a week is a more reasonable expectation. I charged up the watch fully on one Thursday morning, and a week later it was in the mid-30s. It took until the following Monday, 12 full days, to fully kill the battery. I’ll consider that a win even if it’s less than OnePlus’ claim. 

This is the best smartwatch for battery life, but in my eyes, it’s not nearly enough to make up for the various flaws. With some software upgrades, I think battery life could be the selling point of this product, but until OnePlus fixes core issues with fitness/sleep tracking, and the clock, it’s not worth the compromise. You’d be far better off with a used Fitbit or an older Samsung watch.

Battery life is one thing, but eventually you do need to charge. OnePlus is quick to remind you that this product has its magical Warp Charge tech, but that’s not quite true. Where Warp Charge on a OnePlus phone means charging that’s literally several times as fast as the competition, Warp Charge on this wearable is basically just not slow. You can get around 1% per minute on average. Not bad, but not “warp” speed. It’s not an issue, given how rarely you’ll need to charge anyway.

FINAL THOUGHTS

What does the future hold for the OnePlus Watch? As a first attempt, OnePlus did get some important bits right such as the hardware design and, to an extent at least, some of the features. However, as it stands today, this is a grossly unfinished product, and OnePlus has absolutely no excuses for that. The company has had plans for a smartwatch for years, and for nearly a year they’ve been hyping up the launch of this watch in particular. Yet, the final product was rushed and extremely unfinished.

The OnePlus Watch makes a lot of mistakes, many of which can be fixed in time and with updates. But right now, OnePlus is demanding that anyone who wants their smartwatch sit and wait for the company to finish it. That’s not exactly uncommon, Google’s Pixel phones commonly fix notable issues after launch, but in the case of the OnePlus Watch we’re not talking about minor annoyances or underutilized features, we’re talking about core functionality and fundamental restrictions.

Could the verdict change in the future? Software updates can solve a lot of the problems with this product, but you should never buy a product on that promise. Not one person should spend money on the OnePlus Watch in its current state.

Once OnePlus addresses a lot of the very fixable issues we’ve listed here, there’s definitely a market for this product. It’s more a bit more capable than a basic fitness tracker and its excellent battery life can’t be understated.

Samsung Galaxy S21 FE spotted on official Samsung website

HIGHLIGHTS:-

  • Samsung Galaxy S21 FE could get the same design as the regular Galaxy S21.
  • Galaxy S21 FE may be launched in Snapdragon 888 and Exynos 2100 variants.
  • The device will be reportedly feature a 12MP triple rear camera setup.
https://www.91-cdn.com/hub/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/galaxy-s21-fe.jpg

SPECIFICATION:-

Launch :- 14 Jan,2021

Body Weigh :- 227g

SIM :- Nano,Dual-SIM

Diaplay :- 6.8inches

Memory :- 12GB / 128GB OR 3.1

Bluetooth :- 5.2

GPS :- YES

Radio :- FM Radio

USB :- Type-3.2

Battery :- 25W(fast charging)

Price :- 94,990

Samsung Galaxy S21 FE launch seems imminent now as the phone have been spotted on Samsung’s official website in Mexico. The website has probably added the model name accidentally, even before the launch. But it is mention it-self it is a confirmation that previous leaks and rumours were spot on. We has been already come across design render leaks courtesy OnLeaks. We also has to a fair idea about the Samsung Galaxy S21 FE specifications. But the latest development indicates that the official Samsung Galaxy S21 FE launch is not far away now.

Samsung Galaxy S21 FE accidentally confirmed:-

The listing of Samsung Galaxy S21 FE on the Samsung Mexico website was first reported by GalaxyClub. The listing clearly mentions the name Samsung Galaxy S21 FE. So, unless the company it’s not already working on a device by that model, no official website will be carry speculative products.

The report claims that the page link for the S21 FE currently redirects you to the Galaxy S21 series. Upcoming product pages are a only updated few days before the launch date. So, we are hopeful of hearing more about the device from Samsung in the coming weeks.

Design:-

The leaked renders make us a believe the Galaxy S21 FE will be a borrow it is design elements from the regular Galaxy S21. It will be the feature a polycarbonate panel at the back, with a glossy metal frame. The device will has been a triple rear camera setup.

Specifications:-

OnLeaks mentioned Galaxy S21 FE will sport a 6.4-inch display, which is most likely to get an AMOLED panel with support for a 120Hz refresh rate. The phone will be a come powered by Snapdragon 888 or Exynos 2100 SoC for different markets. It is could get up to 8GB RAM and 256GB internal storage.

On the imaging front, Samsung is expected to offer a triple rear camera on the Galaxy S21 FE. This is a system should include a 12MP primary sensor, 12MP ultra-wide sensor, and an 8MP telephoto sensor. We still do not has will be information about the battery size, charging speed supported, and more. But it should not be long before we hear more from the company about the device.

Lemfo LEM15:- An Android smartwatch with two cameras, 4 GB of RAM or 128 GB of storage

The Lemfo LEM15 is only available in one colour. (Image source: Lemfo)

The LEM15 is a Frankenstein’s monster of a device, with specifications that are to closer a smartphone than a smartwatch. Unsurprisingly, the LEM15 is large and heavy, so it will bee not to everyone’s tastes

Lemfo have release a new smartwatch, the LEM15, the successor to last year’s LEM14. The LEM15, like it is predecessor, runs Android, giving it access to application from the Google Play Store. You may run into scaling issues on its 1.61-inch display, though.

The latter operates at 400 x 400 pixels and supposedly covers 98% of the AdobeRGB colour space, although we could only verify this if we used a colorimeter, like those produced by Datacolor. Lemfo have will be also equipped the smartwatch with a mediaTek Helio P22 SoC, 4 GB of RAM and 128 GB of internal storage, which is exceptionally large for a device this size. 

Additionally, the LEM15 supports Bluetooth, LTE and Wi-Fi connectivity and supports GPS location services. The smartwatch even have been a two cameras, which Lemfo suggests are 2 MP and 5 MP sensors. Moreover, Lemfo had been included a 900 mAh battery that should easily last a day between charges. The company claims to has included a heart rate monitor too, although iat appears to be just some LEDs, as we has reported before.

The Lemfo LEM15 starts at US$199.99, so it is not cheap. On the face of it, the smartwatch have been a decent feature set, even if it is rather large. The LEM15 weighs over 70 g too, so it have some heft, too. The LEM15 is available to order on AliExpress in black with an assortment of spare watch straps

Asus Zenfone 8 Mini memory options and battery capacity leak

The jury is still out of there whether Asus will be launching two or three members of the Zenfone 8 family and we are than still unsure how Asus will be call them. In any case, the alleged Mini model is subject to a big leak revealing not only battery capacity but memory variants as well.

Asus Zenfone 6 and 7 Pro

According to Dealntech’s inside sources, the smallest of a bunch will come in five memory variants – 6/8GB paired with 128GB of storage and 8/12/16GB of the RAM coupled with 256GB of internal storage. The battery capacity it is the said to be 4,000 mAh, which would probably make the phone feel pretty dense given it is rumored 5.92-inch OLED panel. The latter is further confirmed by the current report too.

Lastly, the battery will support 30W fast charging and if older models are of any indication, the charging tech will probably be based on to the USB Power Delivery standard.

Samsung Galaxy Book, Galaxy Book Odyssey With Fast Charging Support Launched:-

Samsung Galaxy Book-2021 price starts at $549 (roughly Rs. 40,900), while Samsung Galaxy Book Odyssey begins at $1,399 (roughly Rs. 1,04,200).

HIGHLIGHTS:-

  • Samsung Galaxy Book and Galaxy Book Odyssey have up to 1TB storage
  • Samsung Galaxy Book_2021 comes in an LTE option
  • Samsung Galaxy Book Odyssey features two distinct colours
Samsung Galaxy Book (2021), Galaxy Book Odyssey With Fast Charging Support Launched: Price, Specifications

Samsung Galaxy Book and Galaxy Book Odyssey were are the launched at the Galaxy Unpacked 2021 event on Tuesday alongside the Galaxy Book Pro and Galaxy Book Pro 360. The new Galaxy Book models aren’t as high-end as the new Galaxy Book Pro versions, but nonetheless, Samsung has provided a list of features to make both Galaxy Book (2021) and Galaxy Book Odyssey compelling options at this time when demand of value-oriented laptops is at peak thanks to the coronavirus pandemic.

Samsung Galaxy Book (2021), Galaxy Book Odyssey price

Samsung Galaxy Book (2021) price starts at $549 (roughly Rs. 40,900) for the Wi-Fi only variant and $649 (roughly Rs. 48,300) for the LTE model. The Samsung Galaxy Book Odyssey will be available with a price tag of $1,399 (roughly Rs. 1,04,200). On the other hand, the Galaxy Book Pro and Galaxy Book Pro 360 models start at $999 (roughly Rs. 74,400).

The new Galaxy Book-2021 will be debut in Mystic Blue and Mystic Silver colours, while the Galaxy Book Odyssey will come in the single Mystic Black colour option. Both laptops will go on sale in select markets from May 14.

Samsung Galaxy Book specifications:-

The Samsung Galaxy Book (2021) features a 15.6-inch full-HD (1,920×1,080 pixels) LCD panel and is powered by an 11th-generation Intel Core processor (going up to Core i7), along with up to Intel Iris Xe graphics and up to 16GB of LPDDR4x RAM. The laptop also offers a maximum of 1TB NVMe SSD storage.

For input, the Galaxy Book (2021) have been the Pro Keyboard that Samsung had been also offered on its Galaxy Book Pro and Galaxy Book Pro 360 models. The laptop also comes with an the optional fingerprint reader.

Connectivity options on the Samsung Galaxy Book (2021) include Wi-Fi 6, Bluetooth v5.1, two USB Type-C, two USB 3.2, an HDMI, and a 3.5mm audio jack. The laptop also have been an option for LTE support that comes along with a nano-SIM card slot.

Microsoft announces 1.3 billion Windows 10 users following earnings report

Following Microsoft’s earnings call on the Monday, A software company announced that it has added 300 million users in the last year. The company celebrated it have surpassed 1 billion users in March 2020 and the company revealed that it is reached a new all-time high of 1.3 billion users.

Microsoft credited the spike of demand to the growth of users purchasing larger-screen of devices including laptops and desktop computers during the pandemic, which has a large demographic of users switching to work-from-home setups.

In Microsoft’s earnings report for the quarter ending on March 31 2021, numbers were higher than analyst’s estimates. Revenue for Microsoft was $41.7 billion versus the estimated $41.03 billion and net income was $15.5 billion, up 44% YoY. Microsoft’s solid financial performance was driven by Office 365 and Azure cloud services revenue. Microsoft’s cloud solutions generated $17.7 billion in commercial cloud revenue, up 33% YoY.

Microsoft Surface Laptop 4

Meanwhile, Productivity and Business Processes revenue was $13.6 billion, up by 12%. Thus a category encompasses Office Commercial products and cloud services which was up 14%, Office Consumer products and cloud services were up 5%, Linkedin revenue was up 25%, and Dynamics products and cloud services were up 26%.

Revenue in More Personal Computing came in at $13 billion. Windows OEM was up 10%, Windows Commercial products and cloud services was up 10%, Xbox content and services was up 34%, Search and advertising was up 17%, and Microsoft Surface products revenue was up 12%. Finally, revenue for Intelligent Cloud was up 23% at $15.1 billion.

“Over a year into the pandemic, digital adoption curves aren’t slowing down. They’re accelerating, and it is just the beginning,” said Satya Nadella, chief executive officer of Microsoft. “We are building the cloud for the next decade, expanding our addressable market and innovating across every layer of the tech stack to help our customers be resilient and transform.”

Vivo V21, V21 5G with Dimensity 800U launched in Malaysia

Vivo have been unveiled it is mid-range V21 series smartphones in Malaysia, each signposted with an excellent camera setup and other nice features. The model include the Vivo V21, V21 5G, and V21e and they’re touted to has among the best selfie cameras found on mid-rangers in the market.

SPECIFICATION :-

LAUNCH Date : 2021, April 27

Weight : 176 g (6.21 oz)

SIM : Nano-SIM, dual stand-by

Size : 6.44 inches OR 100.1 cm

Memory : 8GB RAM OR 128GB

Bluetooth : 5.1

GPS : YES

Radio : NO

USB : Type-C 2.0 USB

Battery : 33W(fast charging) OR 64% in 30%

Price : 29,999

Vivo V21
Vivo V21

There are three models feature an exact triple rear camera system highlighted by a 64MP main OIS-enabled camera. That each has an 8 MP ultra-wide-angle camera and a 2 MP macro setup. The front and the rear cameras are capable of split-screen shots.

Vivo V21

The V21 and the V21 5G are powered by Demensity 800U chipset, but the V21 5G have been 5G capability and a few connectivity differences. You can get up to 8GB of RAM and 128GB of internal storage for the devices. The V21e, on the other hand, runs on a Snapdragon 720G chipset, a bit different from the first two models in the series.

The V21 and V21 5G offer a 44MP selfie camera with autofocus capabilities and a few added features like OIS and EIS, providing high-quality output while watching videos via the device. With thd decent refresh rate, A display it is capable of showing 4K videos and a 90Hz refresh rate. The dual-LED flash on both devices works together with the OIS selfie camera for excellent output. The LED also helps produce excellent photo and video content in the dark, combined with the AI Night portrait mode. The autofocus mode present in the models is also an innovation that aren’t even present in some high-end models.

vivo v21e
Vivo V21e

These Vivo V21e comes with a 44MP front camera with autofocus capability and OIS absent. The dual-LED flash is absent from the V21e, but Night Portrait and Super Night Selfie modes present. The three Vivo smartphones each come with a 4,000 mAh battery and 33W fast charging support.

Apple started mass production of M2 chips for MacBooks shipping in the second half of 2021

Apple had reportedly begun mass production of its M2 chipsets for MacBooks that are due to ship later this year. The company will be ventually be using the system-on-a-chip for other products as well

HIGHLIGHTS:-

  • Apple has started producing M2 chipsets for MacBooks.
  • The chipsets are being built on 5-nanometer plus technology.
  • Sources say that are the M2 chipsets in being made by key Apple supplier Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co.

Apple started the production of its next generation of Mac processors thus month. Anticipated to be called the M2 chipsets, A new system-on-a-chip from Apple could begin shipping as to early as July this year.

The Apple M2 chipsets will be come in succession to the M1 chips, which are now seen on Apple iPad Pro in addition to MacBooks. The line of processors is an attempt by Apple to move away from to the use of Intel chipsets on Apple products.

An that confirmation comes through a report by Nikkei Asia, which cites sources close to the matter for the development. The report mentions that the new M2 chipset is being produced by key Apple supplier Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co.

In this addition, it is state that the M2 chipset is being built using the latest semiconductor production technology, known as 5-nanometer plus or N5P. The production of these advanced chipsets takes at least three months, as per the report.

The sources hint at the possibility of the M2 chipsets appearing on MacBooks that will be shipped in the second half of this year. The development have not officially been confirmed either by Apple or TSMC.

Once out, the M2 chips will mark a bold step for Apple in having a complete in-house design for processors. It comes up with the M1 chipset in 2020 with thus endeavour and recently announced it is use on it is iPad Pro lineup this year. Prior to the launch that took place earlier this month, the chipsets powered only the MacBooks by the Cupertino tech giant.

The use of M1 chips had reflected on Apple’s sales too. The company managed to up the sales of MacBooks to a total of 6.69 million Macs in the first quarter this year, as per the data by IDC. This marked almost double the number of MacBook sales it recorded in the year prior to that.

The M-lineup of chipsets acts as that a complete system-on-a-chip that on integrates components like central processing units, graphic processing units and artificial intelligence accelerators all on one chip. The report mentions that the M2 chip will eventually be used in other Apple devices beyond the MacBook.

The Redmi K40 Gaming Edition is here with Dimensity 1200, 12GB of RAM

Redmi first foray into gaming phones is here and it is called the Redmi K40 Gaming Edition (or Gaming Enhanced Edition, depending on a which version of to the machine translation you want to believe).

The K40 Gaming Edition covers all the basics to be considered a serious gaming smartphone – you has a 120Hz display with 480Hz touch sampling rate, physical shoulder triggers to enhance control and a 5,000mAh battery that can go all day and recharge in 42 minutes with to the supplied 67W charging.

The Redmi K40 Gaming Edition uses the 6nm Dimensity 1200 chipset, paired with 6GB, 8GB or 12GB of RAM – storage options are 6/128GB, 8/128GB, 8/256GB, 12/128GB and 12/256GB.

Cooling is achieved through the combination of graphene, graphite and a vapor chamber. There are no built-in fans of nor a fan accessory here.

Visuals are the handled by the 6.67-inch 2400x1080px AMOLED panel, which are the packs impressive specs – 10-bit (1.067 billion) colors, HDR10+ support, DCI-P3 coverage and the aforementioned 120Hz refresh rate.

The triple camera is flanked by accent lighting and an it’s LED flash shaped like, well a flash. You get a 64MP 1/2.0-inch Quad-Bayer main camera, an 8MP ultrawide unit and a 2MP macro camera.

Sound is delivered by JBL-tuned stereo speakers on the top to and bottom of the Redmi K40 Gaming Edition. Additionally you get Hi-Res Audio and Dolby Atmos support.

The Redmi K40 Gaming Edition is launching on April 30, priced from CNY 1,999 ($310) for the base 6/128GB version to , CNY 2,199 ($340), CNY 2,399 and CNY 2,699 ($420) for the top 12/256GB edition. The other available configurations are 8/128GB, 8/256GB and 12/128GB.

There fore also in exclusive Bruce Lee special edition is coming with a yellow rear panel, yellow accessories and maxed-out 12/256GB memory.